The Big Problem for Marketers Reporting in SFDC

The Big Problem for Marketers Reporting in SFDC

To learn more about why reporting in SFDC is bad news for marketers, download our new ebook.

Salesforce can’t tell the complex and unique story of how marketing’s efforts have influenced all the decision-makers on an account. And the problem lies in its inability to accurately track multi-touch attribution.

Each individual account’s journey is by no means a straightforward or linear affair. But with Salesforce—since the tool was not developed to make the marketer’s job easier—you’re only able to capture and report on the first and last marketing touchpoints where a prospect interacted with your brand or product. This effectively knocks all those other influencers out of the equation—and out of your reporting capabilities.

Let’s take a step back and discuss the methods of marketing attribution tracking that you need to utilize.

Single-Touch Attribution

Single touch attribution tracking is when you look at only a single touch in the buyer journey. As explained above, this is typically what brings a lead into your system and what makes him convert.

Single touch attribution is the type of tracking that Salesforce provides. However, as the buyer journey becomes more complex and your buyer and her decision peers self-educate through the buyer journey, single touch is simply doesn’t cut it. It’s not enough to understand what brings someone in. A modern marketer needs to understand what moves that person (and account) through the sales funnel.

Multi-Touch Attribution

Multi-touch attribution is the ability to track and assign value to multiple touches throughout the buyer journey. This type of tracking looks at every single sales and marketing touch and assigns value to each interaction. This type of tracking is something that Salesforce is unable to provide marketers, which is incredibly problematic.

In order to get true multi-touch attribution, you need a third party platform which helps create those attribution models for your business—so you can get true ROI for programs that influenced the buyer journey— from lead to customer acquisition, and everything else in between.

With a third party platform, you can see what channels have influenced the most revenue, have the most opportunity touches, and have the most deal touches. These metrics will show you what channels are helping to move a buyer through the journey to become closed customers.

Without multi-touch attribution tracking, you would never know your most influential channels.

This discrepancy between what actually happened and what can be reported on should make any data-driven marketer feel uneasy. 


Download our latest ebook to learn more about why Salesforce reporting won’t cut it for marketers.

Telling the Whole Story: Why You Should Track All 4 Steps of Your Buyer’s Journey

Telling the Whole Story: Why You Should Track All 4 Steps of Your Buyer’s Journey

To learn more about web tracking and the updated buyer’s journey, download our new ebook.

As B2B marketers, we can’t just look at the beginning or end of our customer journey in a vacuum—this doesn’t tell us the full story of that journey, or offer any real insights into how we can work to improve it.

When looking at the full lifecycle of a customer, there are four distinct and measurable steps to a digital buyer’s journey:

  1. The anonymous touch: The digital channel through which a lead finds you originally—before he becomes known to your organization (ie. AdWords, paid social, organic search, etc.).
  2. The first touch: Where your lead first becomes known to you by filling out a form for an offer such as an ebook download, webinar, and so on. This new lead has now entered your database.
  3. The middle touch(es): The identified touches between the first and last touch point, where a lead interacts with your content or other offers (ie. events, demo requests, etc.). There are often many middle touches.
  4. The last touch: The final place where a lead interacts with your brand before converting into an opportunity or closed deal.

Many marketers track just the first touch and last touch, because the anonymous touch and middle touches are more complicated to track. And some marketers don’t track any of these touches at all. However, the only way to truly measure marketing’s impact within a business is by tracking all four. Because you can’t understand the whole picture without looking at everything that led to the end result.

Problems with Tracking the Anonymous Touch


Before the advent of new tracking technology, the anonymous touch wasn’t measurable, so the journey began at the first touch—as soon as a lead made him or herself known on your website by filling out a form. But that often doesn’t track each and every activity that helped deliver pipeline and revenue. Where did a prospect discover your brand? What piece of content attracted him or her? These are questions that the first touch can’t always answer, but that an anonymous touch can. Think about it—as a buyer, how many Facebook ads, Google searches, blog posts, or web pages do you look at before you actually fill out a form on a company website? Most likely, you do a ton of initial research before you make yourself known. Because these touches are so difficult to track, the marketer is often blind to what is moving you through the funnel.

The story isn’t complete until every touch is captured. And, if you don’t have the whole story, you can’t prove—without a doubt—marketing’s impact on pipeline and revenue.

Download our latest ebook to learn more about how you can track the entire buyer’s journey, from anonymous to last touch.

Top Digital Trends for 2017: What We Learned at MarketingProfs’ Virtual Event

Top Digital Trends for 2017: What We Learned at MarketingProfs’ Virtual Event

Mike Corak’s session at MarketingProfs’ “Marketing Trends for 2017” virtual event centered around the big digital trends that he predicts will emerge or grow this year.

The team, here at BrightFunnel, enjoyed Mike’s session for many reasons—A) It helped our marketing team understand where we should direct our focus this year if we want to stay on-trend, and B) it confirmed something that we already knew: campaign optimization is the way of the future.

So, what does that mean for us marketers?

Before we dig in, here is a quick summary list of Corak’s top trends for digital marketing in 2017:

 

  1. Customer Experience is Still #1: Building stronger relationships by understanding and prioritizing users’ needs.
  2. Mobile Maturity: Investing in mobile-first experiences, mobile-friendly landing pages, and mobile-friendly media.
  3. Content Quality Over Quantity: Measuring content results and doing more of what’s performing well.
  4. What if Google isn’t #1?: Optimizing paid search and social strategies to ensure your content is being seen.
  5. Local Digital Marketing: Locally targeting media in all channels, and localizing emails and content.
  6. Staffing Scrappy: Hiring math majors, journalists, good communicators, empathizers, and people who pay attention to detail and work quickly.
  7. Future Planning: Experimenting and trying out new trends (such as customer digital assistants and immersive experiences) as they emerge.

While they’re all interesting predictions, a few of them really stood out to us: Corak’s focus on enhancing the customer experience, improving the quality of the content you produce, optimizing paid digital channels, and experimenting with emerging trends and technologies. All of these trends have this in common: if you can figure out how to better allocate your budget based on past results, you’ll see more success and earn more praise down the line.

Unfortunately, as B2B marketers in a data-driven culture, our activities are often questioned, our budgets often slashed, and our teams and technologies often insecure. Unlike other departments whose activities are easily quantified (such as sales, for instance), marketing’s activities are more difficult to track and measure in the context of the entire buyer’s journey. And if we can’t prove the ultimate ROI of the content, channels, and campaigns that we’re investing in, it leaves room at the executive decision table for doubt. Because of this, we have to optimize our efforts to enjoy the highest returns, and the best way to optimize is to measure what we’ve done before to see what has worked best—and then do more of that.

This is how we can apply this to the four trends we singled out above:

How do we enhance our customers’ experiences with our products and brands?

According to Corak, customer experience is the most important thing to think about as a marketer in the digital age. When thinking about how to optimize that experience, he suggests that you first capture your customer marketing data, then look at your analytics to see if you’re meeting their needs (and what you’re meeting their needs with), and, finally, apply what you learn to future efforts so that you can continuously improve upon your tactics.

 

How do we make sure that our content quality is improving, and that our audiences are engaging with the assets we publish?

It shouldn’t be a big surprise that content marketing is a huge priority for a lot of companies in 2017. In a Smart Insights survey, referenced by Corak during his presentation, 20.3% of marketers rated content marketing as their top digital marketing technique for 2017. But in order to break through the noise and develop better instead of just more content, Corak suggests auditing your existing assets and looking at how well they’ve performed. If you continue to measure your content’s performance, you’ll be able to ensure your quality is improving, and then do more of what has brought you the most success.

 

How do we make sure that we’re spending intelligently on digital ads and social campaigns?

Digital marketing efforts are some of the hardest to optimize because they are some of the hardest to measure in terms of revenue. But Corak says that it’s definitely worth the investment, as paid search and social channels are now just as important as SEO. To avoid overspending on channels that aren’t delivering pipeline and revenue for their businesses, marketers need to measure these organic and paid digital channels, and then make the appropriate allocation decisions based on what they see.

 

How do we make sure we see returns on the investments we make in flashy new technologies?

Emerging technologies can offer a chance for excellent ROI, but they can also run the risk of falling flat with prospects. Corak suggests that marketers save a little bit of their budget to try new things, and while we agree with him on this, we also suggest—as with all marketing tactics—that they continue to measure every single activity they invest in so that they can get the most bang for their budget buck.

Optimization and smarter spending are a crucial part of the digital marketing landscape in 2017. By investing in a solid plan to track, measure, and intelligently plan your efforts, you’ll be setting yourself up for a successful year across channels, content, customers, and beyond.

Introducing BrightFunnel’s Web Tracking: How to Measure the Updated Buyer’s Journey

Introducing BrightFunnel’s Web Tracking: How to Measure the Updated Buyer’s Journey

When it comes to measuring marketing activities, web tracking is the final frontier.

With web tracking—the ability to see how an anonymous lead came to a website before making herself known with a form-fill—marketers gain the ability to look at every touch throughout an entire customer journey, from click-through to close.

Why does this matter? If you don’t know where those leads are coming from, you can’t track the entire buyer’s journey. Which means that without web tracking, you’re flying one quarter blind.

How can you make better decisions about what to do next if you don’t know what happened first?

The Updated Buyer’s Journey

Up until new advances in web tracking, if you wanted to look back to see where a lead came from, you could only go as far back as the first form-fill. If someone clicked on a Google ad or a Twitter post to get to your webinar, but then changed her mind and didn’t come back to your site for weeks, you certainly wouldn’t know that your ad was effective. You would only find out who she was once she filled out the form to register, or download a white paper, or request a demo.

That original touch was unknown.

Now, the buyer’s journey is made up of four distinct stages:

  1. Original Touch: The digital channel through which a lead finds you originally
  2. First Touch: Where your lead first becomes known to you by filling out a form for an offer.
  3. Middle Touch(es): The identified touches between the first and last touch point, where a lead interacts with your content or other offers.
  4. Last Touch: The final place where a lead interacts with your brand before converting into an opportunity.

If you’re starting at the first touch, you’re not seeing everything. Same applies if you’re tracking just one of the four stages. You can only get an accurate view of the entire updated buyer’s journey if you’re tracking the original to the last touch, and everything in-between.

How It Used to Be

Before the original touch was measurable with web tracking, digital marketing efforts could be measured by click-through rates, but there was no way to tie those click-throughs to pipeline or revenue later on when a buyer converted. This was problematic for digital marketers because a) they couldn’t prove the end results of their work, and b) they couldn’t allocate budget based on ROI. They couldn’t connect all of the dots to see which digital channel were bringing in the most successes.

Pre-web tracking, marketers knew where their leads ended up, but couldn’t tell how they got there. And this left a giant gaping hole in the beginning of the buyer’s journey.

There just had to be a better way!

Turns out, there is.

The Way of the Future

With the advent of new web tracking technologies, it is now possible to track digital channels to see where leads are finding you initially.

By measuring these digital channels, such as search, social, and direct-to-site traffic, you can tie the whole buyer’s journey together and start making better decisions about where to allocate your digital spend. You’ll also be able to prove, without a doubt, how your digital marketing efforts are helping to source pipeline and revenue.

Web Tracking with BrightFunnel

By tracking via direct integration (like with AdWords, for example), UTM parameters, or referral URL mapping, BrightFunnel can help you figure out how your leads are originally finding you and which types of content are attracting them in those channels. Not only that, but you can also connect all of your leads back at the account level.

With all of this new information available at your fingertips, you’ll be well-equipped to report on your past successes and plan for more wins ahead.

Interested in learning more? Sign up for a demo today!

CLOSE
CLOSE